I ... entered the poem of life, whose purpose is ... simply to witness the beauties of the world, to discover the many forms that love can take. (Barabara Blackman in 'Glass After Glass')

These poems are works in progress and may be updated without notice. Nevertheless copyright applies to all writings here and all photos (which are either my own or used with permission). Thank you for your comments. I read and appreciate them all, and reply here to specific points that seem to need it — or as I have the leisure. Otherwise I reciprocate by reading and commenting on your blog posts as much as possible.

19 November 2016

The Vines That Have Been So Leafy

The vines, that have been so leafy
for so many years (seven)
since they started coming over my fence,
are now a tangle of bare branches.

For so many years (seven)
they have spread to cover this side,
and flowered twice a year (being two vines).

Since they started coming over my fence,
I have been training them, winding them
in and out through each other, thickly.

Are, now, a tangle of bare branches 
more and more replacing the abundant green?
But along the top there are still flowers.


















(But by the time I took the photo, the flowers were gone.)

Linked to Poets United's Poetry Pantry #330

28 comments:

  1. And still besuty springs forth. Wonderfully done

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  2. Whew, what a lot of changes seven years can bring! I agree with Martin...beauty still springs forth.

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  3. Lovely to have that edging your yard. I have a clematis that has more branch visible than leafy green, but when the flowers bloom, it is lovely.

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  4. love the still flowering oldie :)

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  5. That seven in parentheses works so well...

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  6. Reflects the lovely joy of gardens.

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  7. This is so beautiful, Rosemary ❤️ such a tangible sense of longing in your verse.


    Lots of love,
    Sanaa

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  8. It is good to work alongside a plant that knows what it wants to do. It is good that it thanks you for your effort too by flowering. But don't let is get too bossy you may have to clip its wings (so to speak) now and then.

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  9. Seven is a magic number..as is the ability of the barest vines to yield life..

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  10. The last line made me smile. All things are good (and possible) while flowers still bloom above the madness.

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  11. What a lovely guest coming over the fence :-)
    ZQ

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  12. those vines, they are like a friend to you. see how you fret over them. :)

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  13. The aging of the vines is somehow the most telling... but still they come and welcome you... hope they will gain strength again.

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  14. Flowers bloom & then disappear.
    Words & poems remain here :)

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  15. Age does take its toll, doesn't it? But beauty does remain, however changed.

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  16. There's hope in this poem, where you look forward to new blossoming, luv that about your vines

    Have a nice Sunday

    much love...

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  17. the vines are symbolic of hope in the journey which took(seven) years to nurture and grow into their own work of art.

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  18. Once again, you remind me of my raspberry bushes. They grew and spread for seven years, and we enjoyed their generous bounty. When the snow melted, and I could walk out to the garden in that seventh year, they were all gone, nary a trace of their existence remained. Not a single twig. A mystery.

    Elizabeth

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  19. What a lovely - and insightful - expression, of how we seek to direct, and somewhat (even) control: time and nature. The use of (seven) works so well in reinforcing our inability to do so.

    By the way (I came to it a bit late, but) thoroughly enjoyed your Leonard Cohen piece at Poets United. Thank you.

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  20. It is believed living things that persist will be bringing in good tidings over a period of time.

    Hank

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  21. Very nice read. I love the last stanza and the bare branches that still have flowers really made me think...bkm

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  22. Such a gentle read with reflection and a presence of now.

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  23. I like the way you took an intruder and made it into a welcome guest!

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