I ... entered the poem of life, whose purpose is ... simply to witness the beauties of the world, to discover the many forms that love can take. (Barabara Blackman in 'Glass After Glass')

These poems are works in progress and may be updated without notice. Nevertheless copyright applies to all writings here and all photos (which are either my own or used with permission). Thank you for your comments. I read and appreciate them all, and reply here to specific points that seem to need it — or as I have the leisure. Otherwise I reciprocate by reading and commenting on your blog posts as much as possible.

31 May 2015

The Music of Light

The music of light is caught
in his eyes. Don't tell him
a song has been hunted and got
and imprisoned there — not dim
even when his lids make shade,
but shining ahead wherever he goes.
Whether he wanders in some glade
or follows the river where it flows,
there is still that radiant music. It lies
behind his own vision, it might be stone
for all it displays to him. But it never dies
to our perception. In colour and tone
it is a unique thing, delicate as finest lawn
or a rippling echo: not quite here, never gone.



That phrase, 'the music of light', has been presenting itself to me for some time, with no context. The Bout-Rimés challenge at 'imaginary garden with real toads' gave me a chance to explore it and see where it led — to a further mystery. 

The end words of these lines come from another poem. We were invited to identify it. I feel that I should and do know it, but can't place it. It's pretty obviously a sonnet, and might be Shakespearian ('glade' is not a word much used today; and 'got' in an older sense — of begotten — is more likely to end a line than the contemporary use I give it). However....

My poem could be seen as a free verse sonnet — having no regular metre, but a sonnet's rhyme scheme and some (unplanned) shifts of focus as it moves into the last six lines and then the last two — or just a 14-line poem. (I wasn't setting out to write a sonnet, but only to follow my imagination.)

I'm also linking to Poets United's Poetry Pantry #254



43 comments:

  1. Amazing what varied treasures we can create from one prompt.

    Not to worry. The dog pictured is not a stray. She is my sweet Ki-Anne, a rescue dog, exploring the stream ahead of me. She is quite spoiled. I will deny any responsibility where my quirky writing takes me.

    Have a blessed evening.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The music of light is caught in his eyes.. What a wonderful image to follow through.. Somehow if we can carry that light within we can survive I think.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is so beautiful :D loved the expressions in this breath-taking piece :D
    xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  4. This poem reads so effortlessly that the concept of 'The Music of Light' must surely exist...it is sounded out beautifully here...

    ReplyDelete
  5. You worked the challenge well. You have captured the magic of the 'music of light.' So true- 'not quite here, never gone.'

    ReplyDelete
  6. This made me think of Orpheus, and the enchanting music of his lyre. Beautiful work, Rosemary.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Agree with Kerry-- the music and light here both wonderful. Somehow I don't think its Shakespearean but Victorian-- the source I mean! Yours is terrific. k.

    ReplyDelete
  8. luv the vibrancy of music captured in light here, and the theme of it being hunted adds to the reality of making thing happen by effort

    have a nice Sunday

    much love...

    ReplyDelete
  9. This is a music that seems to dance the light in words across the page. I, too thought the end-rhymes might have come from a Shakespearean sonnet, but there are so many of them! Or it could have been a Rossetti one--I may have to look now.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Not quite here, but never gone. That says it. It made me think of ghosts that trick those first rays of light allowing us to see those that have passed beyond, but not really. Not yet anyway. They still reside here, perhaps because of the strength of our heart for them.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love how you wrote something with a very different, and lighter, than most of us did, given the words on the list. Very nice, Rosemary.

    ReplyDelete
  12. The music that is "not quite here" is the most haunting of all...

    ReplyDelete
  13. I'm extremely curious to know why we are not to "tell him." I blame the storyteller in me, always wanting to know, "What happens next!"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Can't enlighten you, I'm afraid. I only know as much of the story as the poem gave me!

      Delete
  14. I love that 'radiant music' that he follows...seems to be it's within him...

    ReplyDelete
  15. Rosemary, this poem appeals in so many ways - a very tight write. Love the focus, the scope, the whole idea of the music of his inner light, and the closing "not quite here, never gone". Fantastic work! I can see the light in his eyes all the way across the planet.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your poem is incredibly romantic .. I enjoyed reading it.

    ReplyDelete
  17. This speaks to me of the music in the journey of life that calls us onward..the never ending song ..once we catch a glimpse it haunts us.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Beautiful imagery and idea.....having the music of light caught in his eyes. I like that.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I am intrigued with this idea of the music of light....I read and reread your wonderful poem following this music of light through his eyes....

    ReplyDelete
  20. For me, your closing line was intriguing...about echos, "a rippling echo: not quite here, never gone" neat!

    ReplyDelete
  21. there's music everywhere. even silence has its own. :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. I think perhaps it our job to reuse those words that fall out of favor for some inappropriate made up
    ones; Not that Shakespeare did not coin a few! So "sylvan glade" is I am sure I have sneaked in once or twice in my writing! So while you are writing such beautiful poems slips a few more in do!

    ReplyDelete
  23. The title got me hooked to this lovely poem ... wonderfully written :-)

    ReplyDelete
  24. The music of light.... Not quite here, but never gone.... so lovely and ethereal

    ReplyDelete
  25. music and songs... they really are important and have a powerful effect upon our spirt... Nice take on these words.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Ephemeral nature, I like this idea very much.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Your title, as you illustrated has a gold mine to explore...
    ZQ

    ReplyDelete
  28. Oh it is magical. The idea as a musician makes me excited and free - like when I first heard that notes have color...

    ReplyDelete
  29. The music of the light....very interesting thought.....because indeed it's never gone and not here yet...I see sometimes dreams with music at the background....and sometimes nothing even happens but music, always peaceful and inviting...~ now, reflecting in his eyes - another facet of the poem....another riddle in the maze you only know...~ magical, esp. with these required words.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I love how you listened and patiently awaited an opportunity to express "the music of light" appropriately, Rosemary. A true talent takes the pieces and puts them together in good time. Well done.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Gee, Rosemary, you have made these words your own. I never would have guessed you wrote this beauty to such a prompt. I felt I should know the poet, too. But I cannot dredge it up in my brain.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I've got a feeling it's John Donne -

    Greart work oh Snaky one

    ReplyDelete
  33. Replies
    1. Yes, Bjorn who set th prompt has divulged the secret: Richard Wilbur's 'Death of a Toad' — which I was not familiar with after all.

      Delete
  34. This is wonderful, Rosemary. It flows seamlessly, and I love the ending.

    ReplyDelete
  35. you've captured this so well, Rosemary ~

    ReplyDelete
  36. Rosemary,

    A most calming piece of writing. Reading after a stormy day of wind and rain...Your placid notes were very welcome.
    Eileen

    ReplyDelete
  37. when i read this....i saw someone dancing in the crystal reflections of the rivers waves. how inspiring! thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  38. not quite here, never gone

    I loved your Music of Light - I'm sure I hear it often. LOL

    ReplyDelete