I ... entered the poem of life, whose purpose is ... simply to witness the beauties of the world, to discover the many forms that love can take. (Barabara Blackman in 'Glass After Glass')

These poems are works in progress and may be updated without notice. Nevertheless copyright applies to all writings here and all photos (which are either my own or used with permission). Thank you for your comments. I read and appreciate them all, and reply here to specific points that seem to need it — or as I have the leisure. Otherwise I reciprocate by reading and commenting on your blog posts as much as possible.

29 January 2017

Poetry in the Mouth

After Neruda: ‘Sweetness Always’

Some poems 
are hard and immobile
as statues
made of gilded stone.
Though fine indeed to gaze upon
from behind the barrier,
how can they portray
the everyday?

The sweet everydayness of things
I want to put in my mouth, 
bite down and suck, lap my tongue
around and through the honey taste.
Please make me, bake me
a confection of a poem,
to feed and sustain me!
Always, then, I will sing it.














Written in response to Weekend Mini Challenge: Condense a Poem at 'imaginary garden with real toads'. The original Neruda piece may be found at this link. We were asked to restate it, condensed, in our own words while keeping the essence of the original.

Photo of baklava from public domain.

14 comments:

  1. Ummmm baklava, one of my faves.......I love this poem, dear poet, who will forever sing through the beauty of your words.

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  2. Love it, like the strength, the surprises, the humanity, the Neruda inspiration. Yum yum, food for body, food for spirit.

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  3. Poetry and food are two of the most sensual things there, and your poem sings this truth deliciously. Your first stanza made me grin from ear to ear. I would've blushed, too, but... blushing doesn't go with the complexion of my wild witchy heart. ;-)

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  4. A poem is meant to not be gazed upon, but savored! Awesome!

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  5. Yes that's how a poem should be, tasty and filling.

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  6. Great title, Rosemary! I love your'reduction' of Neruda's poem to a satisfying 'baklava' - light, honeyed and definitely not 'hard and immobile / as statues /
    made of gilded stone'. I almost sang the final lines as I read them!

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  7. Truly a treat. scrumptious and sweat

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  8. "a confection of a poem,
    to feed and sustain me!" That's what I love too. A poem that feeds my senses and soul over and over again.

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  9. I love the sweet, everydayness of this.

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  10. "The sweet everydayness of things
    I want to put in my mouth,
    bite down and suck, lap my tongue
    around and through the honey taste."

    I love that! Perfect!!

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  11. And the best thing of all, poetry isn't fattening!

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