I ... entered the poem of life, whose purpose is ... simply to witness the beauties of the world, to discover the many forms that love can take. (Barabara Blackman in 'Glass After Glass')

These poems are works in progress and may be updated without notice. Nevertheless copyright applies to all writings here and all photos (which are either my own or used with permission). Thank you for your comments. I read and appreciate them all, and reply here to specific points that seem to need it — or as I have the leisure. Otherwise I reciprocate by reading and commenting on your blog posts as much as possible.

10 September 2017

Letter to a Lasting Love


















Little Prince, I loved you at first sight. 
When I came to know you better,
your inner beauty matched and deepened
the sweet exterior, so my love deepened too.

I grew more intimate with you; at first 
swiftly, immediately, filled with increasing 
excitement and wonder ... astonished, rapturous.
Then even closer and better: leisurely, gradually.

'Time cannot weary nor custom stale.' I return
again and again, sometimes after long absence –
yet, you are never truly far from me. Your words
whisper often in my innermost ear, sound in my heart.

Oh excellent teacher and friend, I am and am not
possessive. I hold your physical body close, clasped
to my breast. Yet I share you with many. Once you lent 
one man and me your language (before he returned to his star).


Responding to Magaly's irresistible prompt at 'imaginary garden with real toads': My Dearest Book, I Wrote You a Poem ...  
(But the phrase in quotes is, of course, from Shakespeare.)

20 comments:

  1. I feel the wondrous love! And how can one not adore this prince of tales? It was the first book I owned, which wasn't a textbook. My original copy was lost in a military move and I still mourn the loss. Your poem inspires me to read it again. And I shall. Tonight. Thank you!

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  2. Oh yes, my grandson, when he was young and heartbroken and living with me, loved this book, as did I. Such beauty!

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  3. I would have love to have grown up with a book like this. To not just love the pictures and the text but the book itself,

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    1. I am like that with all my favourites – those I have had from childhood and those which, like this one, I discovered later. I can't get rid of them even if I think I won't read them again, because they feel like my friends. I only have to look at the outsides of them to remember what they contain and the whole experience of reading them the first time, and what they gave to me.

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  4. Such a heartfelt write Rosemary. I never read this book as a child or as an adult. Onto the list it goes.

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  5. I always regret leaving my copy behind when I moved back to England. I think anyone who reads The Little Prince can only fall in love with it.

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  6. Maybe books are like lovers -- only better than the flesh and blood ones, because we join with them as we wish. This poem is pure love song.

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  7. This is so gorgeously written!💘 Especially love; "'Time cannot weary nor custom stale.' I return again and again, sometimes after long absence – yet, you are never truly far from me. Your words whisper often in my innermost ear, sound in my heart."

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  8. I discovered this book as an adult. I immediately fell in love with it. It is truly a book for the ages and for all ages. Most beautiful and loving write.

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  9. TLP is many people's favorite book. I read it many many years ago--all I can remember now is the baobab tree. Perhaps it is time for a re-read!

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  10. A book come alive. Like your poem, what part is real and what part is story? (does it really matter)

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    1. Oh, I think metaphor and allegory are real! (Smile.)

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  11. Love your ending on this, Rosemary. This is a book I have never read, but hope to soon.

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    1. Thank you. I'm a little surprised no-one else mentioned the ending. It is a direct reference to something in the book – as you will discover.

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  12. I have never read this book...but i loved your poem...would like to read this book now

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  13. I know what you meant about the star. I'm sure he'll be there waiting when it's your turn to return to a star.

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  14. Just a lovely book, and a favorite of mine too. I am sure that you know quite well how to recognize a snake who's swallowed an elephant. Take care, k.

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