I ... entered the poem of life, whose purpose is ... simply to witness the beauties of the world, to discover the many forms that love can take. (Barabara Blackman in 'Glass After Glass')

These poems are works in progress and may be updated without notice. Nevertheless copyright applies to all writings here and all photos (which are either my own or used with permission). Thank you for your comments. I read and appreciate them all, and reply here to specific points that seem to need it — or as I have the leisure. Otherwise I reciprocate by reading and commenting on your blog posts as much as possible.

18 April 2015

Friday Haiku




Cloudy morning.
Cobwebs
across the view.

***

At the Gallery
clouds and mountains
through the window.

***

Noisy Miners*
shriek at the roof.
A cooling breeze.

***

Midnight.
My black cat
miaows.


*Noisy Miner — Australian bird.


Prompt 17 for 'Poems in April' at 'imaginary garden with real toads' is to write haiku. Once upon a time I used to do that every Friday. I think I should start again; I've got rusty! Apparently in America the 17th of April is National Haiku Poetry Day (and therefore internationally online). I wonder if that's because of the 17-syllable rule. As we are told a 'syllable' in Japanese doesn't really equate to the English, I no longer stick to that but aim for something briefer.

This is an unconnected series, not a sequence.


28 comments:

  1. Beautiful :D
    Perfect for National Haiku Day :D
    Loved it....!!
    xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  2. Replies
    1. Yes. Not to be confused with Indian Mynah.

      Delete
  3. love the visual and aural haiku...the last one is sweet :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I like how your cat miaows. It has its own voice.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This was simply beautiful. - Mosk

    ReplyDelete
  6. luv how the sounds push throom the gloom

    thanks for dropping in to read mine

    much love...

    ReplyDelete
  7. These poems recreate the atmosphere and scenes very well. We also have the noisy mynahs in SA.

    ReplyDelete
  8. You've not lost it at all!! I really like your use of brevity and that you don't bother with the syllables. For me, I love the way your last compliments the style of Basho's old pond haiku. Excellent!

    ReplyDelete
  9. All terrific. I especially like the gallery! k.

    ReplyDelete
  10. You do these so well! The last one is my favorite.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Nice trio, Rosemary. I like the thought of the miners coming up. But you squared away, thanks. I had now idea that Noisy Miners were Australian birds. They might have had some that we saw in Tasmanian sanctuary and we didn't even know.
    ..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are not the kind we put in sanctuaries, Jim. Not rare or endangered, and not popular because of their noisiness.

      Delete
  12. Midnight is splendid and I really enjoy them all. I agree. I think haiku would be better if we would not be so slavish to the counted rule. I should have done that. I will next time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I — along with many others — take the view that syllable count is the least important rule in haiku. I think it's much more important to capture a moment in its essence, without embellishment.

      Delete
  13. I can sympathize with you for that restless night.. sometimes the cat can be a nuisance.. marvelous set.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Mmm. These haiku are stepping stones through the day. Visual and aural--very neat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, that's exactly right, Susan. Well spotted.

      Delete
  15. I love all of them. Each one an exclamation on life.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I liked all of these.

    Thanks for visiting.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Very good Rosemary. I like the cobweb art gallery.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I also love the cobweb art! Well done

    ReplyDelete
  19. when I was in Perth some years back, I noted the crows cawing in a different dialect than what I am accustomed to, back in the States. regardless, your 'ku's resonate ~

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The crows are all right. The Noisy Miners really do shriek; their only and persistent note.

      Delete
  20. Love, love, love the ambiguity of "Noisy Miners". For before your clarification, I did think of a gang of miners screaming in a bard or something like that. The "breeze" seemed to be a joy for both the birds and the possible workers.

    I'm quite taken by the cobwebs, too... ♥

    ReplyDelete