I ... entered the poem of life, whose purpose is ... simply to witness the beauties of the world, to discover the many forms that love can take. (Barabara Blackman in 'Glass After Glass')

These poems are works in progress and may be updated without notice. Nevertheless copyright applies to all writings here and all photos (which are either my own or used with permission). Thank you for your comments. I read and appreciate them all, and reply here to specific points that seem to need it — or as I have the leisure. Otherwise I reciprocate by reading and commenting on your blog posts as much as possible.

10 October 2014

Europe — a Heritage

While devising deliverance, river of light
is alarmingly, musically misty in flight.

Like a mystical madrigal brilliant from sun
look at blasting and lasting, the frill falling down.

Will you listen oh lilting one, madly oh merry
all over the messenger mock and not tarry.

You are locking your laughter while singing a height
to be always delectable, midnightly bright.

For a flanging me fearlessly, flaying delight
to forlornly, mysteriously slippery steep night.

Oh my rose, oh the river, oh roaming alone
ah the links are deserted, delinquent in stone.

My mellifluous Melisande, Hellespont lost
in maleficent mystery soften to tossed.

Were desirous debacle colloidally cold
will collapse for invincible, boldly to gold.

31 Poems in 31 Days (from Poewar / Writer's Resource Center). Prompt: a poem using metre. (This is anapestic tetrameter.)

Also submitted for dVerse Meeting the Bar: Verbal Cubism. We are asked to use poetic devices but fracture meaning and grammar a la Gertrude Stein and others.  Not a type of poetry I much enjoy reading, but it was fun to do. It wasn't so hard to fracture meaning. As anyone who knows me woud appreciate, getting rid of grammar was MUCH harder for me, but I managed it occasionally. 

The title came afterwards, just because some of the references are European. That part of my heritage interests me a lot less than the Asian and Australian, so I thought I might acknowledge it for once.

16 comments:

  1. ha you pulled out all the tools...a bit of consance and assonance, allit...contrast in midnightly bright...cool rhythm to the piece...singing a height was a cool phrase...

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  2. "Oh my rose, oh the river, oh roaming alone
    ah the links are deserted, delinquent in stone."

    my favorite lines... sweet and sorrow mixed together

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  3. I agree with Wolfie, those were my favorite lines too, and yes--as a non-poem cubist word puzzle, it has flawless form, like a ballet dancer slumming at a disco, we see the breeding, the training, the form; lots of fun to read though.

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  4. I admire the rhyming couplet specially this:

    For a flanging me fearlessly, flaying delight
    to forlornly, mysteriously slippery steep night.

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  5. fun and energetic, this one's a gem.

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  6. you have some nice sound going on in there...my fav is..maleficent mystery soften to tossed...

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  7. Your poem begs to read aloud, Rosemary. I like the 7th stanza the most. The 'm' words made me smile.

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  8. This should be read aloud - I agree with Mary.. It begs to be read in the manner of Richard Burton. Great use of all the poetic devices to be found..

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    1. Oh, to hear this read aloud in the manner of Richard Burton would be hilarious!

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  9. "You are locking your laughter while singing a height
    to be always delectable, midnightly bright."............my favorite stanza and midnightly bright shines and shines...

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  10. You did really well in your exploration of sounds. I like the idea of a 'mystical madrigal'.

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  11. Oh, I love the rhythm, the alliteration, yes, this begs to be sung. It's terrific. Thank you.

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  12. I loved the rhythm of this, the sound of it when read out loud! Well done indeed!

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