I ... entered the poem of life, whose purpose is ... simply to witness the beauties of the world, to discover the many forms that love can take. (Barabara Blackman in 'Glass After Glass')

These poems are works in progress and may be updated without notice. Nevertheless copyright applies to all writings here and all photos (which are either my own or used with permission). Thank you for your comments. I read and appreciate them all, and reply here to specific points that seem to need it — or as I have the leisure. Otherwise I reciprocate by reading and commenting on your blog posts as much as possible.

17 October 2014

Trees

twine with the stars at night
to travel unseen heights
tracking the mysteries,
touching the Pleiades.

Their roots stretch underground
too, Pleiadian light
taken down, deeply wound,

tangled in our depths and
thrusting up through the crust,
through red earth, clay or sand.

Trees know these Sisters well;
they love them as they must.
They love, and they stand tall,
threading light through the dust.





















At Poets United this week the Midweek Motif prompt is Trees. At dVerse Meeting the Bar today we are asked to write in the 'Pleiades' form of seven six-syllable lines with a one word title, every line beginning with the initial of the title. Not quite what was asked for: I've written a Pleaides followed by a reverse Pleiades, as one poem, and added  a rhyme scheme not actually required. We were also asked to include the name of a heavenly body, so I chose the obvious. And — obviously —I've combined both prompts.

39 comments:

  1. Owwwooooo! Wow. And the ttttts have it for the win! Actually, there is no competition in this poem, just an artful tangling of the kind sisters do when they love each other. Brilliant use of the form times 2.

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  2. The light in the trees, it made me think of Telperion and Laurelin, the trees from "The Silmarillion." Well written.

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    1. Thank you. *Reminds self - get around to reading that book at last!*

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  3. smooth as silk - this one flowed brilliantly

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  4. Wowzers, you wrapped the prompts in one brilliant package and tied it with red ribbon! Fantastic, Rosemary!

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  5. The trees are a true link between the soil and stars.. The flow and the creative use of breaking the form up into many stanzas work wonders.

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    1. Oh yes, that's right — I already forgot I made that modification too!

      (Yes, the trees are, aren't they? *Smile.*)

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  6. what a brilliant combo...love this sweet & lasting relationship of the trees with the seven sisters....

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  7. oh loved the effect a lot....beautiful

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  8. Great use of the form and really like the way you have made it into a full fledged long poem , an inspiration to me!!Thanks

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    1. Actually you were the inspiration to me! (Or half of it anyway.) I enjoyed trying this form, but just couldn't say all I wanted in a mere seven lines.

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  9. We tend to give natural things attributes that we have ourselves have not realizing they probably have some we would dearly love ourselves. I really must try this form of poetry (or my version of it I expect). Very impressed.

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  10. Very clever weaving of the connection between stars and trees ~ Love the t words and format of the poem ~

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  11. very nice work on the form...i should have thought of linking them to get me more space...ha...it is a cool connection you make as well from tree to star...i am particularly fond of trees...

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  12. Fantastic job bringing both prompt and form together. Your images seen to come alive with this. Brava!

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  13. nice meeting of the minds... like salt and pepper.. it worked and was a good read

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  14. Loely word work here Rosemary!

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  15. the beauty and grandeur of nature
    towering to celestial crests
    tracing new trajectories from
    timeless roots
    the poem reflects strength of faith
    tenderness of humanity
    togetherness with love and loyalty -
    talent superb in poetic expression

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  16. I love the idea of the trees pulling the light of the stars into their roots...into the ground. Beautiful work and great idea to link sets of these for a longer variation. :)

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    1. I have always seen trees as a conduit between earth and heaven / heaven and earth.

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  17. This is lovely, Rosemary. You have really aced the Pleiades form.

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  18. Perfect blend for the two prompts, Rosemary. This celebrates the deeper meaning of trees for me. What would we do without them.

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  19. A lovely job of combining the prompts..there is something so alluring about trees and nature.

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  20. Quite a feat to have as many T words to be used and combining the prompts! Trees would be missed if they are not around. Less greenery obviously! Great lines Rosemary!

    Hank

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  21. That last stanza is lovely, love the imagery of "threading light through dust."

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  22. Like the connection between trees and light...and sure the last stanza brings it all together. Enjoyed reading. Beautiful poem. x

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  23. Rosemary, this is officially my favorite poem of the week, along with Carrie's offering!

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    1. Aww! How you warm my heart! Dashing off at once to see Carrie's. :)

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  24. I much appreciate everyone's lovely comments!

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  25. Very well done - all those T words for a poem meeting two prompts. :-)

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  26. Clever, touching; like the creative way you met the parameters of the prompt, but had the audacious oomph to add several other factors; the poetics came first, & last. Impressed with this one.

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    1. Thank you Glenn. Yes, the poetics do come first and last; It's very nice to have that recognised.

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