I ... entered the poem of life, whose purpose is ... simply to witness the beauties of the world,
to discover the many forms that love can take. (Barabara Blackman in 'Glass After Glass')

This blog is not, 'Here are my very best poems'. It's for work in progress, subject to revision.
Posts may be updated without notice at any time. Completed work appears in my books.

17 November 2012

Fibonacci Experiments


Family

He 
phones 
tonight,
my birthday;
we talk a long time.
He's my friend as well as my son.
(His father is dead and his brother is lost to us.)


We 
talk 
tablets,
mobile phones —
and his new girlfriend.
At Easter they'll come to visit.
(Small core of family left, we're glad of each other.)


Wet City

My 
love's
drowning:
Venice is
flooded and under
water — that city of water —
of sparkling, of singing water.
Now too much water
washes her:
Venice
my
love.


Continuing

We entered the dark of the moon.
Roses were growing
unseen but
their scent
waft-
ed

fill-
ing
the night
with silent
messages of life
continuing to spend itself.



Fibonacci poems (aka fibs) are syllabic, based on the fibonacci numerical sequence in which each number is added to the preceding to make the next. Zero is understood at the beginning, so the syllables then go: 

(1=0=) 1
(1+1=) 2
(1+2=) 3
(2+3=) 5
(3+5=) 8
(5+8=) 13

Theoretically one could keep going, but in a poem that would get more and more unwieldy. It's usual to stop at 8, but not uncommon to continue to 13. And then, as you see, one can vary the form by doubling, reversing, etc.

Submitted for Poets United's Poetry Pantry #124




18 comments:

  1. i like your play with the form...the first is sad, but with hope in a small core...i know it will be well to be together again soon....really like the middle one as well...

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    1. Thanks, Brian. Interesting, your preferences - the first two are authentic, the last wholly imagined.

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  2. That third one is especially magical...beautiful.

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    1. Oh, thank you. I'm glad to know it works.

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  3. I'm not familiar with that form, but I really enjoyed your verse.

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  4. Each one of these is so lovely. Yes, when the family gets smaller, we need each other so much more. Pleased that your son and you have such a good bond.
    I saw on the news about Venice being under water. Soon, the water will be everywhere, permanently. Very sad.

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    1. As you will gather, I fell in love with that city (at first sight!). Yes, tragic.

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  5. very lovely tone and voice- flowed beautifully - enjoyed these very much

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  6. Enjoyed them all. Favorites the first two - I always enjoy the personal touch in poetry; but the last ones were beautiful too. I love the shape of the last one.

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  7. Second stanza...discussions are of what's new (gadgets and girlfriend) but ultimately leads to the tradition of Easter and family gathering. Great contrast.

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    1. Oh I love it when people point out how clever I've been — that even I didn't realise! :) (It's there in the poem to be found, but must have come straight from the subconscious.)

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  8. a lovely experiment in form, without losing the poetic. Love the shape poems especially.

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  9. These are all lovely images tinged with sadness and aloneness.
    Roses, your loving son and Easter to look forward to.A little family of two but a family nevertheless.

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    1. I am glad you like them. Yes, I am blessed in this son.

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